Question about recovery time

This is a question similar to Squatbig's a few threads down about recovery time. I've always somehow been able to recover fast from squatting/deadlifting, or pretty much any type of leg workout in general (I'm almost never sore after squatting, unless I've been on some type of lay-off). My question is, if I FEEL fine and able to squat again, say after a day of rest, is it reasonable to squat again, having 3-4 sessions a week? A lot of times, I feel great several hours after squatting and wish I could do it all over again. So many times, I'll feel like squatting twice in one day, and have done so a couple of times. I'm sort of scared to train this often though without getting some of your opinions, as I'm sure there are many athletes who have overtrained by doing too much work, even when they feel up to it. Any thoughts?

Re: Question about recovery time

Graham wrote:
This is a question similar to Squatbig's a few threads down about recovery time. I've always somehow been able to recover fast from squatting/deadlifting, or pretty much any type of leg workout in general (I'm almost never sore after squatting, unless I've been on some type of lay-off). My question is, if I FEEL fine and able to squat again, say after a day of rest, is it reasonable to squat again, having 3-4 sessions a week? A lot of times, I feel great several hours after squatting and wish I could do it all over again. So many times, I'll feel like squatting twice in one day, and have done so a couple of times. I'm sort of scared to train this often though without getting some of your opinions, as I'm sure there are many athletes who have overtrained by doing too much work, even when they feel up to it. Any thoughts?

I aint no expert, but it would seem to me you are not squatting heavy enough?

Question about recovery time

Either you are a very gifted athlete who can handle a lot of frequency, or you are doing something wrong. If the first one is the case, then go for it!!

Question about recovery time

I'm definitely squatting heavy enough. Depending on what part of the yearly cycle I am in, I am for the majority working anywhere from 5x5 @ 80% to 6x3 @ 85-90%.. Most of the time very high intensity, but other times I may be going more volume, like 4-5x10 for example. I dont know, I think I have just become very comfortable with heavy lifting and it doesn't really phase me anymore, other than the high demand on the CNS. I've ehard that olympic lifters can squat anywhere from 5-7 times a week due to the very low volume but high intensity.

Question about recovery time

Somewhere in this site I believe there is way to find out how often you can train base on reps at a certain intensity. I wil look for it tomorrow, off to bed. I dont know, but after a C leg workout the last thing I want to do is squat again on the same day hehehe.

Question about recovery time

Clearly, you recover fast. This can only happen when 1) You have mosty red fiber, and 2) you aren't pushing hard enough with the weights or reps. Simple...PUSH!!!!! Amp the reps/sets/weight! PUSH!

You are a candidate!

Some guys can squat 3 times a week. You may be one of 'em. I was!

Question about recovery time

Thanks Doc. I'm definitely not dominately red fiber being a high jumper, but it's possible I'm not making every rep out to be 100% effort like you say, so I will give it a try and see what happens.

Re: Question about recovery time

Graham wrote:
This is a question similar to Squatbig's a few threads down about recovery time. I've always somehow been able to recover fast from squatting/deadlifting, or pretty much any type of leg workout in general (I'm almost never sore after squatting, unless I've been on some type of lay-off). My question is, if I FEEL fine and able to squat again, say after a day of rest, is it reasonable to squat again, having 3-4 sessions a week? A lot of times, I feel great several hours after squatting and wish I could do it all over again. So many times, I'll feel like squatting twice in one day, and have done so a couple of times. I'm sort of scared to train this often though without getting some of your opinions, as I'm sure there are many athletes who have overtrained by doing too much work, even when they feel up to it. Any thoughts?

In 1992 I took my bench press max up 70 pounds in 49 days by benching 7 days a week. I wouldn't recommend a frequency like that by ANY means, but it did work quite well.

Some of Chad Waterbury's workouts are intriguing. Each muscle can recover much faster than many of today's pundits lead us to believe. In 1992 it was common for experts to recommend training a bodypart 2 or 3 times a week (in Hardcore Bodybuilding Dr Squat recommended training a bodypart every 2-5 days depending upon the bodypart and the type - A, B, or C - of the workout, and this would be training a bodypart 2-3 times a week, generally).

Nowadays, perhaps due to the permeating influence (conscious or unconscious) of HIT, folks rarely recommend working out a bodypart more than once a week.

Re: Question about recovery time

li0scc0 wrote:
(in Hardcore Bodybuilding Dr Squat recommended training a bodypart every 2-5 days depending upon the bodypart and the type - A, B, or C - of the workout, and this would be training a bodypart 2-3 times a week, generally).

This true, except for squats. While you must listen to your body parts. A typical ABC routine will put your squats at A (3days rest) B (4days rest) C (5 days rest) then backwards thru B and back to A. So, between B cycles you would end up squatting twice in one week, but one of those work outs (A) would be very light 50%.

Re: Question about recovery time

li0scc0 wrote:
In 1992 I took my bench press max up 70 pounds in 49 days by benching 7 days a week. I wouldn't recommend a frequency like that by ANY means, but it did work quite well.

If it worked so well for you, why don't you recommend a frequency like that by ANY means?

Re: Question about recovery time

norwegianwood wrote:
li0scc0 wrote:
In 1992 I took my bench press max up 70 pounds in 49 days by benching 7 days a week. I wouldn't recommend a frequency like that by ANY means, but it did work quite well.

If it worked so well for you, why don't you recommend a frequency like that by ANY means?

Great question! I should have said I would not recommend such an approach in most circumstances.

I tried such a routine with four other trainees. (I know, I know - Being a statistician I realize a sample size of four is not statistically significant, yet it is a) more significant than the typically anecdotal sample size of 1 Laughing out loud and b) relevant to the discussion at hand).
The trainees were:
Male, age 22 - somewhat out of shape, strong lower body, weak upper body. His Goal was to get in better shape and improve upper body strength as well as lower body strength
Male, age 38 - extremely low bodyfat, bench press specialist, weak lower body. His Goal was to improve bench press and upper body strength
Female, age 22 - very lean, athletic looking, my training partner at the time (lucky me). Her Goal was to enter a fitness show
Male, age 27 - typical gym rat, no structure to his program. Used poor form to heave more weight. Goal was to 'get huge'

Each and every trainee was burned out within 3 weeks and demonstrated initial symptoms of overtraining. None gained any functional strength and the female showed a dramatic loss in strength, yet when she was put on a 4 day per week lifting program training each bodypart only 1x per week she improved greatly, to the point where she was soon using 55 pound dumbells for 8-10 reps on incline presses at a bodyweight of 108 pounds. The male age 22's sweet spot was a 5 day per week program on a 2 day split, thus working each bodypart 5 times in 2 weeks.

I concluded that the difference was in the ability to withstand frequent and intense training. My body was used to everyday training both in the form of weights and in cardio - at the time I was lifting AND running, running every day very intensely (Heart Rate of 155 or greater for 20-50 minutes) and able to run a 22 minute 4 miler and a sub 5 minute mile. At the time my resting heart rate was around 45-49. For lifting, before commencing the 7 day a week program I was doing whole body workouts 5 days per week (Monday through Friday). None of the other trainees had developed such a tolerance to intense frequency even though each were previously on training programs and all, other than the 22 year old male, would have been considered fit by most definitions.

A long-winded answer, I realize, but hopefully that explains why i could not give a blanket endorsement to such high frequency training

Question about recovery time

Legs are the largest most used muscle group, because of this they can recover fast. Also, squating produces more test production and HGH.

Question about recovery time

DLS is right. I think over a time period of one year of doing exclusively leg training I've just adapted to high fequency training. I'm oging to start squatting twice on fridays and amping the sets and intensity like Doc suggested to see if I can see even greater gains. My squat has gone up about 100 lbs since early august so I'm definitely still seeing some nice gains despite not working to my fullest ability. Thanks for all the replies

Question about recovery time

I have done front squats 4 times a week different load each time. Some people can squat 12+ times a week. Cause they train 2 times a day.

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